Below is my brief report on attending the conference.  It is useful mostly for me, but there are some good links to ideas I was exposed to that might also be useful for you.
-JMS
Objectives of the conference:
The ECIS IT preconference with Scott Klososky on vision, culture and future-proofing international schools had three main foci.  These included:
1. What every School Head needs to know about the digital plumbing that’s required to facilitate the effective use of IT at your school.
2. How to structure your long-range planning process, how to predict what will be needed at your school and how to promote stakeholder “buy-in.”
3. How to promote a school culture that fosters team building and increased productivity.
The main conference itself was much more loosely structured, and was presented by a range of presenters including IT directors, curriculum managers, teachers and even some vendors.  The sessions I attended included:
1. Modifying a school-wide online curriculum to better reflect and guide IT integration, John Simon Esteller
2. Building a “socially augmented” school. Shabbi Luthra and Scott Klososky
3. In-time, on-going & self-directed professional development: cultivating a personal learning network, David Warlick
4. From access to success: foundations of 1:1 in the classroom, Leah Treesh
5. iPads for learning & lower school literacy, Warren Apel
6. Rebooting schools and education for the 21st century, Johnson Jacob

Summary of what was learnt or derived from attendance at the course
1. What every School Head needs to know about the digital plumbing that’s required to facilitate the effective use of IT at your school.
Cloud computing is very close to becoming a resource that’s very easy to implement and Rosey needs to develop a Cloud Transition Document – even if we decide not to immediately do it.  Visualizing and organizing data is key to being able to make best use of it. And, business process management can/should be leveraged to streamline repetitive tasks (think: report cards, enrolling students, etc).
2. How to structure your long-range planning process, how to predict what will be needed at your school and how to promote stakeholder “buy-in.”
Three key items need to be considered when developing this and they are: macro trends (global, economic, governmental, etc.), educational trends (curriculum changes, new technology, governmental requirements, etc.) and local trends (new campus, new buildings, changes in local economy etc.). With these items, bullet-point out all the potential factors that will shape the school.  From here, design an investment portfolio that reflects and addresses these trends.
3. How to promote a school culture that fosters team building and increased productivity.
Discussed were methods for determining what type of culture exists at your school and techniques for massaging it into one more able to adapt to change.
1. Modifying a school-wide online curriculum to better reflect and guide IT integration, John Simon Esteller
ATLAS is heavily used and is considered one of the best systems for managing the curriculum.  The term “integration” is an explicit term and implies “not core subject.”  Teams need to meet 2x/week & one of those meetings with curriculum specialist or principal.
2. Building a “socially augmented” school. Shabbi Luthra and Scott Klososky
Leveraging social media can help the school with:
communicating with the school community
enhancing the teacher’s tooklit
parental involvement
student tools
online or blended learning
Managing the school’s online reputation is very important – and doable – but the management of it must be explicit and not ad-hoc.
3. iPads for learning lower school literacy, Warren Apel
iPads are not computers – they are a new platform that is ideally situated to school use – especially young learners.  He shared with us a lot of stumbling blocks that he ran up against as he was running his pilot project – but said that despite the roadblocks, the platform is too rich to ignore.

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